expand Blue Cheer update from Eric Albronda...............Ruben , I finally got my copies of Blue Cheer 7 which is on vinyl and colored blue naturally with numbers 1-500 for the collectors . I produced this album along with Jim Keylor in 1978-9. It was put on Ice and is now released very little is out just yet about it but I believe I gave you the contact of Rich Patz the owner of the producing label.
He
re it is again
shroom@trinicom.com
I would suggest contacting him immediately with my reference and referral so that you might get some of this quickly ahead f everybody else . I would be happy to answer your questions as always but hearing it from the 'Man" might be better in this case.
Hope you are well, as always,
anytime ,
eric
some interesting stuff
The recording and producing of "Blue Cheer 7"

Jim Keylor-
Jim was the leader of the pack of misplaced genius's. while in high School in /Davis, California Jim developed a science of personal growth called the "Dyno"
system of human potential. fro example while constructing the BSU Studio Jim collected newspapers and articles from all of his famous friends and had a machine called the "Dyno Knowledge Enhancer " . In its most simple explanation this machine would devour all of the news papers and grind them up until well into the pul;p range thus fusing all of the knowledge of the day and would then inject this liquid knowledge into the walls of the studio for insulation purposes .
as Jim was the leader he had a gift of mobilizing his fringes talents to accomplish a common goal, In this case the construction of BSU Studios. the work day was long yet rewarding in that after a hard day Jim would treat everyone to a visit to "The Ness" where for some reason ones spirits would be exalted beyond belief .
also at the end of the day Jim would sometimes treat everyone to a fine dinning experience at the Universal Cafe on 24 Th. Street distinguished by the menu of way over 300 entrees none above $1.50.so you can see being in Jim's care was
reward enough.
Jim is also a great Bass Player however , decided not to play bass on the BC7 Project but rather be the overseer . from his experience with the band, The Oxford Circle , Jim was already famous as their name appeared on many of the early Posters from the sixties and they played at "The Fillmore Auditorium" and "The Avalon Ballroom" in San Francisco. So, when it came time for the actual recording Jim used his musical genius to instill an atmosphere of collective greatness for the project as Co Producer.

Jack May-
Jack May refused a full ride scholarship to Harvard University but turned it down instead to become one of the most talented musicians and technicians of his day -We all miss Jack very much.
The very first time , I met Jack , he was playing at the Fillmore Auditorium with Dickie Peterson in a band called Group B. He looked like a telephone pole as he invented this box he wore around his waist about a foot square that contained
a patented circuit from which extended probably ten wires minimum who gave his guitar the desired sound . Now this technology was secret and barely after the invention of the transistor . Jack called this The "Ferkel 415".
Jack was funny all the time and a true comic genius as his IQ was off the map and he showed the world what it meant to laugh-a lot .
Jack was also an integral part of the wiring of BSU Studios . Jack invented the
.56 Sound elongation system using the latest Ferkel transducers and collective
Thermulator Switching System ( his invention )which allowed the microphones to ride up and down the stands to capture the best positioning of the .56 Sound elongation system This is a very important step in recording science and evidenced in the quality of the BC7 recordings. Also Jack manufactured the very first BSU Patching system . The idea came to Jack after examining the brain scans of famous musicians. At any rate Jack spent weeks designing and building by hand the brains of the BSU Studios main terminal and axis center.
Jack seemed to always be thirsty for some reason so in-between gulps of his favorite beverage he would entertain us all with his quick wit and theories of the
Cosmos. Yep, Jack May , a true original , one of the best. Missed by all who knew him.

Charlie Isabella--
Also known as Izzy - When Izzy was young his parents noticed he would never talk to anybody but rather would sing his words so everything came out musical.
At the time a famous Stanford Surgeon invented an operation and mechanical device called the Lyric Crossover Speech Transverter. Charlie was lucky enough to have one of these devices implanted in his head . The results were alarming and the only side affect was that Charlie now talked all of the time 24/7 as it was.
Now thats all fine except when something needed to be accomplished . What better job for Charlie then being a Cab Driver for city Cab and also a student at the Jean Sheldon , school of Acting in San Francisco. we all went and saw Charlie in his graduation solo performance . All I remember is that it went on and on for over two hours and I have no idea what it was about or what he said .
Charlie wrote one of the best songs , along with Jim Keylor, on the BC7 album-Title- 'I want you once Again" and in the case of Charlie again , and again ,and again and again…………
We all loved Charlie and miss him greatly. Charlie lived in the loft he made at Jim Keylor's house. Charlie would accompany us all to the Universal Cafe and we were never bored.

Jim Alcivar--
Another of Jim Keylors genius friends. Jim reminded me of the famous Scientific American Article called " Joy the Mechanical boy " or" the boy in the bubble" from which Paul Simon wrote the lyric , "the boy in the bubble and the baby with the valve in its heart, these are the days of miracle and wonder ……………" all of which describes Jim Alcivar, except the valve in his heart he had none.
Jim had played keyboards with the famous Ronnie Montrose , recently deceased , in a band called Gamma . Jim also was a genius of sound and you could tell because I never understood what he was talking about . He would take off on a tangent and not touch down long enough for me anyway , to understand him. Jim did however get along with everyone because he could do what ever was needed as far as musical ideas or mechanical ones or whatever to make our jobs all the easier. Sort of the opposite of Dickie Peterson yet together they would entertain me for hours at their differences of style and humor. Jim worked well with Tony Rainier , the guitar player , for some reason they hit it off and would compliment each other well. Jim was great during the actual recording because when present he would suggest things that seemed to fit in a positive way although as I said I never understood what he was talking about. but thats OK really because I rarely did anyway.

Eric Albronda- Now Eric had worked on five of the six Blue Cheer albums as mostly a producer but did sing on two of them and wrote a few songs for Leigh Stephens the original guitar player of Blue Cheer. Eric had a unique production style because basically he would just hold up a mirror to the musicians and show them themselves and what they were doing ……Not easily intimidated in that Eric was a classically trained musician he said what ever came up and was definitely not a "Yes Man" such things as " go home , your playing sucks .
"Hay , man you are out of tune ". Get off the floor you idiot but wake up first.
"That song was the Sh…, so come back tomorrow ." Here , take this money and get your bass out of hock and while your at it here is some money for tomorrow too."
Eric had years of working with Blue Cheer and this job of production was only natural for him and with Jim Keylor's help has produced a very important and timeless piece of music.

And so went the recording of Blue Cheer #7

Eric Albronda April 2012

Thanks Eric! rdc


www.bluecheerfan.com presents a peek of "You Don't Know DICKie" ....filmed and produced by Bill Baker. You don't know Dickie. You just don't. Every day could...


from "New! Improved! Blue Cheer" 1969


www.bluecheerfan.com presents a peek of "You Don't Know DICKie" ....filmed and produced by Bill Baker. You don't know Dickie. You just don't.






The Los Angeles Free Press 60's Music Site
See video
The Other Half - Bad Day (60's Garage Punk)


Blue Cheer - Blitzkrieg Over Nüremberg - Ride With Me / 1988


www.vickibrennerent.com
Blue Cheer HomePage






Blue Cheer update from Eric Albronda...............Ruben , I finally got my copies of Blue Cheer 7 which is on vinyl and colored blue naturally with numbers 1-500 for the collectors . I produced this album along with Jim Keylor in 1978-9. It was put on Ice and is now released very little is out just yet about it but I believe I gave you the contact of Rich Patz the owner of the producing label.
He
re it is again
shroom@trinicom.com
I would suggest contacting him immediately with my reference and referral so that you might get some of this quickly ahead f everybody else . I would be happy to answer your questions as always but hearing it from the 'Man" might be better in this case.
Hope you are well, as always,
anytime ,
eric
some interesting stuff
The recording and producing of "Blue Cheer 7"

Jim Keylor-
Jim was the leader of the pack of misplaced genius's. while in high School in /Davis, California Jim developed a science of personal growth called the "Dyno"
system of human potential. fro example while constructing the BSU Studio Jim collected newspapers and articles from all of his famous friends and had a machine called the "Dyno Knowledge Enhancer " . In its most simple explanation this machine would devour all of the news papers and grind them up until well into the pul;p range thus fusing all of the knowledge of the day and would then inject this liquid knowledge into the walls of the studio for insulation purposes .
as Jim was the leader he had a gift of mobilizing his fringes talents to accomplish a common goal, In this case the construction of BSU Studios. the work day was long yet rewarding in that after a hard day Jim would treat everyone to a visit to "The Ness" where for some reason ones spirits would be exalted beyond belief .
also at the end of the day Jim would sometimes treat everyone to a fine dinning experience at the Universal Cafe on 24 Th. Street distinguished by the menu of way over 300 entrees none above $1.50.so you can see being in Jim's care was
reward enough.
Jim is also a great Bass Player however , decided not to play bass on the BC7 Project but rather be the overseer . from his experience with the band, The Oxford Circle , Jim was already famous as their name appeared on many of the early Posters from the sixties and they played at "The Fillmore Auditorium" and "The Avalon Ballroom" in San Francisco. So, when it came time for the actual recording Jim used his musical genius to instill an atmosphere of collective greatness for the project as Co Producer.

Jack May-
Jack May refused a full ride scholarship to Harvard University but turned it down instead to become one of the most talented musicians and technicians of his day -We all miss Jack very much.
The very first time , I met Jack , he was playing at the Fillmore Auditorium with Dickie Peterson in a band called Group B. He looked like a telephone pole as he invented this box he wore around his waist about a foot square that contained
a patented circuit from which extended probably ten wires minimum who gave his guitar the desired sound . Now this technology was secret and barely after the invention of the transistor . Jack called this The "Ferkel 415".
Jack was funny all the time and a true comic genius as his IQ was off the map and he showed the world what it meant to laugh-a lot .
Jack was also an integral part of the wiring of BSU Studios . Jack invented the
.56 Sound elongation system using the latest Ferkel transducers and collective
Thermulator Switching System ( his invention )which allowed the microphones to ride up and down the stands to capture the best positioning of the .56 Sound elongation system This is a very important step in recording science and evidenced in the quality of the BC7 recordings. Also Jack manufactured the very first BSU Patching system . The idea came to Jack after examining the brain scans of famous musicians. At any rate Jack spent weeks designing and building by hand the brains of the BSU Studios main terminal and axis center.
Jack seemed to always be thirsty for some reason so in-between gulps of his favorite beverage he would entertain us all with his quick wit and theories of the
Cosmos. Yep, Jack May , a true original , one of the best. Missed by all who knew him.

Charlie Isabella--
Also known as Izzy - When Izzy was young his parents noticed he would never talk to anybody but rather would sing his words so everything came out musical.
At the time a famous Stanford Surgeon invented an operation and mechanical device called the Lyric Crossover Speech Transverter. Charlie was lucky enough to have one of these devices implanted in his head . The results were alarming and the only side affect was that Charlie now talked all of the time 24/7 as it was.
Now thats all fine except when something needed to be accomplished . What better job for Charlie then being a Cab Driver for city Cab and also a student at the Jean Sheldon , school of Acting in San Francisco. we all went and saw Charlie in his graduation solo performance . All I remember is that it went on and on for over two hours and I have no idea what it was about or what he said .
Charlie wrote one of the best songs , along with Jim Keylor, on the BC7 album-Title- 'I want you once Again" and in the case of Charlie again , and again ,and again and again…………
We all loved Charlie and miss him greatly. Charlie lived in the loft he made at Jim Keylor's house. Charlie would accompany us all to the Universal Cafe and we were never bored.

Jim Alcivar--
Another of Jim Keylors genius friends. Jim reminded me of the famous Scientific American Article called " Joy the Mechanical boy " or" the boy in the bubble" from which Paul Simon wrote the lyric , "the boy in the bubble and the baby with the valve in its heart, these are the days of miracle and wonder ……………" all of which describes Jim Alcivar, except the valve in his heart he had none.
Jim had played keyboards with the famous Ronnie Montrose , recently deceased , in a band called Gamma . Jim also was a genius of sound and you could tell because I never understood what he was talking about . He would take off on a tangent and not touch down long enough for me anyway , to understand him. Jim did however get along with everyone because he could do what ever was needed as far as musical ideas or mechanical ones or whatever to make our jobs all the easier. Sort of the opposite of Dickie Peterson yet together they would entertain me for hours at their differences of style and humor. Jim worked well with Tony Rainier , the guitar player , for some reason they hit it off and would compliment each other well. Jim was great during the actual recording because when present he would suggest things that seemed to fit in a positive way although as I said I never understood what he was talking about. but thats OK really because I rarely did anyway.

Eric Albronda- Now Eric had worked on five of the six Blue Cheer albums as mostly a producer but did sing on two of them and wrote a few songs for Leigh Stephens the original guitar player of Blue Cheer. Eric had a unique production style because basically he would just hold up a mirror to the musicians and show them themselves and what they were doing ……Not easily intimidated in that Eric was a classically trained musician he said what ever came up and was definitely not a "Yes Man" such things as " go home , your playing sucks .
"Hay , man you are out of tune ". Get off the floor you idiot but wake up first.
"That song was the Sh…, so come back tomorrow ." Here , take this money and get your bass out of hock and while your at it here is some money for tomorrow too."
Eric had years of working with Blue Cheer and this job of production was only natural for him and with Jim Keylor's help has produced a very important and timeless piece of music.

And so went the recording of Blue Cheer #7

Eric Albronda April 2012

Thanks Eric! rdc



Now in stock! Blue Cheer 7 represents a rare look at the worlds first true Heavy Metal Blues Band during a late 70s reincarnation which was closest to their original great success of Vincebus Eruptum, their million selling first album. Raw,
heavy, and straight to the point - sit back and listen and turn it way up and know you are experiencing a big part of music history in this rare and wonderful glimpse of Dickie Petersons BLUE CHEER. This deluxe gatefold 150 gram multi colored vinyl edition will only be available in 500 numbered copies. All subsequent pressings will be standard black vinyl. Produced by Eric Albronda and Jim Keylor. Recorded at Army Street Studios in 1979. Distributed by ShroomAngel Records!